Best Practices or Common Practices

I'm using the phrase "best practices" less and less when working to establish good agile practices. In fact, I've stopped using it at all. The primary reason is that it implies there is a set of practices that apply to all circumstances. And in the case of "industry best practices," they are externally established criteria - they are the best practices and all others have been fully vetted and found wanting. I have found that to be untrue. I've also found that people have a hard time letting go of things that are classified as "best." When your practices are the "best," there's little incentive to change even when the evidence strongly suggests there are better alternatives. Moreover, peer pressure works against the introduction of innovative practices. Deviating from a "best" practice risks harsh judgment, retribution, and the dreaded "unprofessional" label.

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